Building Codes

The Texas statutes, administrative rules, and local ordinances occasionally adopt, incorporate, or refer to technical codes published by independent organizations. These codes describe scientific and safety standards for structures and discuss specifications for fire safety, electrical systems, plumbing fixtures, construction practices, and many other topics. Below you will find links to some of the codes that have been adopted in the Texas statutes and in the Texas Administrative Code.

Building codes are not reprinted within the statutes or the local ordinances themselves. They are “adopted by reference” or “incorporated by reference” and are usually available to review at the city clerk's office and at some public libraries. Please contact your local public library or your local government for assistance accessing codes not available online.

For more information about the practice of “adopting by reference” or “incorporating by reference,” the National Archives provides an explanation of “incorporation by reference” from the National Archives. Though the information on that page refers to the practice as used by the federal government, it is a good description of the practice itself.

While a statute or administrative rule may adopt a specific edition of a code, the statute or rule may also permit a state agency or local governments (e.g., municipalities, counties) to adopt updated editions of the code or to make amendments to the codes. Because of this, we will usually refer you to your local government officials for information about which specific codes are in effect. Larger cities may have a code enforcement department or a permitting department that could help.

Building codes are not reprinted within the statutes or the local ordinances themselves. They are “adopted by reference” or “incorporated by reference” and are usually available to review at the city clerk's office and at some public libraries. Please contact your local public library or your local government for assistance accessing codes not available online.

It depends. When possible, we link to the codes below if they are available online. Some years and editions are not currently available for free online access through the publisher. To read these versions of the codes, you may need to consult with your local public library or the city clerk's office.

The codes below are published by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials (IAPMO), the International Code Council (ICC), and the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). Please note that these publishers allow only limited online access to their publications. In order to view NFPA publications, you must first set up a profile and agree to their licensing restrictions. To view IAPMO documents, you may need to install Adobe Flash Player.

Codes Adopted by the State

Disclaimer: The list of codes we provide on this page is not exhaustive. These are the “incorporations by reference” that the library has identified and found relevant as building codes. Any laws quoted on this page are not the official versions of the law. If you would like additional assistance, please contact a reference librarian, but keep in mind that the library cannot determine which codes apply to your specific situation nor can we advise you on how to proceed with a particular project.

Local Government Code
Chapter 214. Municipal Regulation of Housing and Other Structures
Sec. 214.212. International Residential Code

Section 214.212 adopts the International Residential Code as it existed on May 1, 2001, for certain residential structures. Please read the text of the statute and the definitions provided in Local Government Code 214.211 for more details.

Under this law, a municipality may review and adopt amendments to the International Residential Code. For the correct version of the code for your municipality, please contact your local government officials.

Local Government Code
Chapter 233. County Regulation of Housing and Other Structures
Sec. 233.153. Building Code Standards Applicable

Section 233.153 adopts the International Residential Code as published as of May 1, 2008, or the version adopted by the county seat for certain residential structures in unincorporated areas of certain counties. Please read the text of the statute, the definitions in Local Government Code 233.151, and the applicability of the statute in Local Government Code 233.152 for more details.

Note: Section 233.153 is only applicable if the county in question has adopted a resolution or order requiring it and meets certain other conditions. See Section 233.152 for details on its applicability.

Texas Administrative Code
Title 16. Economic Regulation
Rule §70.100 Mandatory Building Codes

Rule 70.100 adopts the International Residential Code, 2015 edition, for industrialized and modular residential buildings:

(a) Effective August 1, 2017, all industrialized housing and buildings, modules, and modular components, shall be constructed in accordance with the codes referenced in subsection (c) - (j).
[…]
(d) The International Residential Code, 2015 edition, published by the International Code Council, is adopted as the Residential Code for one- and two-family dwellings of the Texas Industrialized Housing and Buildings Program.

Texas Administrative Code Title 16, Chapter 75 (Air Conditioning and Refrigeration), Rule 75.100 (Technical Requirements) adopts the International Residential Code for certain residential buildings in municipalities where no code has been adopted. According to Texas Administrative Code Title 16, Chapter 75 (Air Conditioning and Refrigeration), Rule 75.110 (Applicable Codes), the 2012 edition of the IRC shall be used for work permitted or started before January 1, 2018. For work started after January 1, 2018, the 2015 edition of the IRC has been adopted.

Health and Safety Code Chapter 388 (Texas Building Energy Performance Standards), Section 388.003 (Adoption of Building Energy Efficiency Performance Standards) adopts the energy efficiency chapters of the International Residential Code as the energy code in Texas for single-family residential construction. For construction before September 1, 2016, the IRC as it existed on May 1, 2001, is adopted. For construction after September 1, 2016, the IRC as it existed on May 1, 2015 is adopted. Please see the text of the statute for details.

To achieve energy conservation in single-family residential construction, the energy efficiency chapter of the International Residential Code, as it existed on May 1, 2001, is adopted as the energy code in this state for single-family residential construction. On September 1, 2016, the energy efficiency chapter of the International Residential Code, as it existed on May 1, 2015, is adopted as the energy code in this state for single-family residential construction.

For rehabilitation activities of single-family homes beginning on or after January 5, 2017, Texas Administrative Code Title 10, Chapter 21 (Minimum Energy Efficiency Requirements for Single Family Construction Activities, Rule 21.6 (Rehabilitation Activities) requires that various chapters of the 2015 International Residential Code apply. Please see the text of the rule for details.

Texas Administrative Code Title 10, Chapter 80 (Manufactured Housing), Rule 80.26 (Registration of Stabilizing Components and Systems) adopts the International Residential Code regarding stabilizing components for manufactured homes. Please read the text of the rule for more details.

The Department adopts the applicable standards and publications set forth in Chapter 43 of the International Code Council, latest edition of the International Residential Code for materials used to fabricate stabilizing components and systems. The Department adopts the stabilizing component destruction test failure criteria of the FMHCSS (24 CFR, Part 3280) or latest edition of the International Residential Code, Appendix E.

Texas Administrative Code
Title 22. Examining Boards
Rule §367.2 Code Requirements

Rule 367.2 adopts the 2012 edition of the Uniform Plumbing Code and the 2012 International Residential Code as incorporated by reference in the 2012 International Plumbing Code.

[T]he Board adopts the following plumbing codes:
(1) the 2012 Uniform Plumbing Code, as published by the International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials; and
(2) the 2012 International Plumbing Code, as published by the International Code Council and the codes incorporated by reference within the 2012 International Plumbing Code, including:
[…]
(B) the 2012 International Residential Code.

Local Government Code
Chapter 214. Municipal Regulation of Housing and Other Structures
Sec. 214.216. International Building Code

Section 214.216 adopts the International Building Code as it existed on May 1, 2003, for commercial buildings:

[T]he International Building Code, as it existed on May 1, 2003, is adopted as a municipal commercial building code in this state.

Under this law, a municipality may review and adopt amendments to the International Building Code. For the correct version of the code for your municipality, please contact your local government officials.

Texas Administrative Code Title 40, Chapter 92 (Licensing Standards for Assisted Living Facilities), Rule 92.61 (Introduction and Application) requires that new construction of assisted living facility buildings and structures must comply with local codes. In the absence of local codes, the International Building Code 2000 edition or later applies. Please see the text of the rule for details.

Texas Administrative Code Title 28, Chapter 5 (Property and Casualty Insurance), Subchapter E (Texas Windstorm Insurance Association), Division 1 (Plan of Operation) requires specific structures to be compliant with the International Building Code in order to be eligible for catastrophe insurance. Please see the text of the rules in this Division for more details.

Texas Administrative Code Title 16, Chapter 70 (Industrialized Housing and Buildings), Rule 70.100 (Mandatory Building Codes) adopts the International Building Code 2015 for industrialized and modular buildings:

(a) Effective August 1, 2017, all industrialized housing and buildings, modules, and modular components, shall be constructed in accordance with the codes referenced in subsection (c) - (j).
[…]
(c) The International Building Code, 2015 edition, published by the International Code Council, is adopted as the Building Code of the Texas Industrialized Housing and Buildings Program.

Occupations Code Chapter 1202 (Industrialized Buildings), Section 1202.1535 (Effect of Building Code Amendment) adopts the International Existing Building Code for industrialized buildings that have been altered after the Texas Industrialized Building Code Council adopts or amends a new code. Please read the text of the statute for more details. Texas Administrative Code Title 16, Chapter 70 (Industrialized Housing and Buildings), Rule 70.100 (Mandatory Building Codes) specifically adopts the 2015 edition.

In the absence of local building codes, Texas Administrative Code Title 25, Chapter 134 (Private Psychiatric Hospitals and Crisis Stabilization Units), Rule 134.122 (Physical Plant and Construction Requirements) requires that either the 1999 Uniform Building Code or the 1997 Standard Building Code be adhered to. Note: The Uniform Building Code and the Standard Building Code are regional legacy codes that have now been replaced by the International Building Code.

For construction before January 1, 2004: In the absence of local codes, Texas Administrative Code Title 19, Chapter 61 (School Districts), Rule 61.1033 (School Facilities Standards for Construction before January 1, 2004) states that the school district shall adopt and use the latest edition of either the Uniform Building Code or Standard (Southern) Building Code (and related fire, mechanical, and plumbing codes); and the National Electrical Code. Note: The Uniform Building Code and the Standard Building Code are regional legacy codes that have now been replaced by the International Building Code.

For construction on or after January 1, 2004: In the absence of local codes, Texas Administrative Code Title 19, Chapter 61 (School Districts), Rule 61.1036 (School Facilities Standards for Construction on or after January 1, 2004) requires that a school district adopt and use the building code and related fire, plumbing, mechanical, fuel gas, and energy conservation codes from the latest edition of the family of International Codes as published by the ICC; and the National Electrical Code as published by the NFPA. Alternately, they may adopt the building code and related fire, plumbing, mechanical, fuel gas, and energy conservation codes as adopted by a nearby municipality or county.

Local Government Code
Chapter 214. Municipal Regulation of Housing and Other Structures
Sec. 214.214. National Electrical Code

Section 214.214 adopts the National Electrical Code as it existed on May 1, 2001, as the municipal electrical code in Texas. This law also allows a municipality to adopt amendments to the National Electrical Code. For the correct version of the code for your municipality, please contact your local government officials.

Occupations Code
Chapter 1305. Electricians
Sec. 1305.101. General Powers and Duties

Section 1305.101 requires the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation to adopt a revised version of the National Electrical Code every three years as the electrical code for Texas. As of March 2019, the 2017 edition has been adopted by Texas Administrative Code Title 16, Chapter 73 (Electricians), Rule 73.100 (Technical Requirements).

Texas Administrative Code Title 25, Chapter 135 (Ambulatory Surgical Centers), Rule 135.52 (Construction Requirements for a New Ambulatory Surgical Center) requires all electrical material and equipment to be compliant with the 2002 edition of the NFPA 70. Please see the text of the rule for additional details.

In the absence of local codes, Texas Administrative Code Title 40, Chapter 92 (Licensing Standards for Assisted Living Facilities), Rule 92.61 (Introduction and Application) requires compliance with the National Electrical Code (NEC) as specified under 2000 edition of the NFPA 101. Rule 92.63 (Construction and Initial Survey of Completed Construction) requires detailed fire detection and alarm system working plans in accordance with the relevant chapters of the NEC.

Texas Administrative Code Title 16, Chapter 13 (Regulations for Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)), Rule 13.102 (Installation of Electrical Equipment) requires electrical installations located within the vicinity of any compressor, cascade, or dispensing equipment to be in accordance with the National Electrical Code (NEC) for Class 1, Group D: Hazardous Locations, Division 2 area.

Texas Administrative Code Title 25, Chapter 117 (End Stage Renal Disease Facilities), Rule 117.102 (Construction Requirements for a New End Stage Renal Disease Facility) requires all new electrical material and equipment to be compliant with the 2002 edition of the NFPA 70. Please see the text of the rule for additional details.

Texas Administrative Code Title 28, Chapter 34 (State Fire Marshal), Rule 34.821 (Manufacturing Operations) requires that the wiring, switches, and fixtures in storage buildings at fireworks manufacturing plants comply with the 1984 edition of the National Electrical Code.

Rule 34.823 requires that electrical installations, if used, in storage facilities for more than 500 cases of Fireworks 1.4G comply with the 1984 edition of the National Electrical Code.

Texas Administrative Code Title 25, Chapter 131 (Freestanding Emergency Medical Care Facilities), Rule 131.141 (Construction Requirements for a Pre-Existing Facility) requires that any facilities operating on or before June 1, 2010, have electrical materials and equipment that are in compliance with the 2002 edition of the NFPA 70. Please see the text of the rule for additional details and requirements.

Texas Administrative Code Title 25, Chapter 131 (Freestanding Emergency Medical Care Facilities), Rule 131.143 (Construction Requirements for a New Facility) requires that any facilities operating on or before June 1, 2010, have electrical materials and equipment that are in compliance with the 2002 edition of the NFPA 70. Please see the text of the rule for additional details and requirements.

Texas Administrative Code Title 25, Chapter 133 (Hospital Licensing), Rule 133.162 (New Construction Requirements) requires all new electrical material and equipment to be compliant with the 1999 edition of the NFPA 70. Please see the text of the rule for additional details.

Texas Administrative Code Title 16, Chapter 70 (Industrialized Housing and Buildings), Rule 70.100 (Mandatory Building Codes) adopts the 2014 edition of the National Electrical Code for industrialized and modular buildings:

(a) Effective August 1, 2017, all industrialized housing and buildings, modules, and modular components, shall be constructed in accordance with the codes referenced in subsection (c) - (j).
[…]
(j) The National Electrical Code, 2014 edition, published by the National Fire Protection Association, is adopted as the Electrical Code of the Texas Industrialized Housing and Buildings Program.

Texas Administrative Code Title 40, Chapter 90 (Intermediate care facilities for individuals with an intellectual disability), Rule 90.61 (Introduction, Application, and General Requirements…) requires that electrical and illumination systems must be designed and installed in accordance with the National Electrical Code. Rule 90.65 (Fire Alarms, Detection Systems, and Sprinkler Systems) states that wiring and circuitry for fire alarm systems also must comply with the NEC.

Texas Administrative Code Title 10, Chapter 90 (Migrant Labor Housing Facilities), Rule 90.2 (Facilities) requires that electrical wiring and lighting fixtures be installed and maintained in accordance with the National Electrical Code and local codes.

Texas Administrative Code Title 30, Chapter 285 (On-Site Sewage Facilities), 285.34 (Other Requirements) requires that all electrical wiring shall conform to the requirements of the 1999 National Electrical Code.

Texas Utilities Code Chapter 181 (Miscellaneous Powers and Duties of Utilities), Section 181.045 (Standards for Construction, Operation, and Maintenance of Lines) requires that a municipal electric utility shall construct, operate, and maintain its transmission power lines and distribution power lines in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code “as published in March 1948 by the National Bureau of Standards, Handbook 30, as revised by Handbook 81, published by the National Bureau of Standards in November 1961.”

Texas Utilities Code Chapter 38 (Regulation of Electric Services), Section 38.004 (Minimum Clearance Standard) requires power lines shall be constructed, operated, and maintained with respect to clearance in accordance with the edition of the National Electrical Safety Code “in effect at the time of construction.”

Texas Administrative Code Title 25, Chapter 134 (Private Psychiatric Hospitals and Crisis Stabilization Units), Rule 134.122 (Physical Plant and Construction Requirements) requires all new electrical material and equipment to be compliant with the 1999 edition of the NFPA 70. Please see the text of the rule for additional details.

For construction before January 1, 2004: In the absence of local codes, Texas Administrative Code Title 19, Chapter 61 (School Districts), Rule 61.1033 (School Facilities Standards for Construction before January 1, 2004) states that the school district shall adopt and use the latest edition of either the Uniform Building Code or Standard (Southern) Building Code (and related fire, mechanical, and plumbing codes); and the National Electrical Code. Note: The Uniform Building Code and the Standard Building Code are regional legacy codes that have now been replaced by the International Building Code.

For construction on or after January 1, 2004: In the absence of local codes, Texas Administrative Code Title 19, Chapter 61 (School Districts), Rule 61.1036 (School Facilities Standards for Construction on or after January 1, 2004) requires that a school district adopt and use the building code and related fire, plumbing, mechanical, fuel gas, and energy conservation codes from the latest edition of the family of International Codes as published by the ICC; and the National Electrical Code as published by the NFPA. Alternately, they may adopt the building code and related fire, plumbing, mechanical, fuel gas, and energy conservation codes as adopted by a nearby municipality or county.

Texas Administrative Code Title 25, Chapter 125 (Special Care Facilities), Rule 125.91 (Construction Requirements) requires all electrical material and equipment to be compliant with the 1999 edition of the NFPA 70. Please see the text of the rule for additional details.

Texas Administrative Code Title 30, Chapter 217 (Design Criteria for Domestic Wastewater Systems), Rule 217.326 (Electrical and Fire Code Compliance ) states that the facilities must comply with local electrical codes. In the absence of a local electrical code, the rule adopts the most recent edition of the National Electrical Code.

The electrical elements of a wastewater treatment facility and collection system must conform to local electrical codes. If the wastewater treatment facility or collection system is located in an area that does not have a local electrical code, the electrical elements must comply with the most recent edition of the National Fire Protection Association 70 National Electrical Code® at the time of installation.

Health and Safety Code Chapter 388 (Texas Building Energy Performance Standards), Section 388.003 (Adoption of Building Energy Efficiency Performance Standards) adopts the International Energy Conservation Code as it existed on May 1, 2001, as the energy code for all construction other than single-family residential housing. The statute also permits the State Energy Conservation Office to adopt a later version of the IECC.

Texas Administrative Code Title 34, Chapter 19 (State Energy Conservation Office), Rule 19.53 does adopt later versions of this code. As of March 2019, this rule adopts the International Energy Conservation Code as it existed on May 1, 2015, as the energy conservation code for all non-single-family residential construction:

All other residential, commercial, and industrial construction. Effective November 1, 2016, the International Energy Conservation Code, as it existed on May 1, 2015, is adopted as the energy code for use in this state for all residential, commercial, and industrial construction that is not single-family residential construction under subsection (a) of this section.

Texas Local Government Code Chapter 233 (County Regulation of Housing and Other Structures), section 233.062 (Application and Content of Fire Code) permits counties with populations of 250,000 or more or that are adjacent to counties with populations of 250,000 to adopt a fire code. This code must be consistent with the requirements of the International Fire Code as it existed on May 1, 2005, or the Uniform Fire Code as it existed on May 1, 2005.

Under this law, a county may choose between the Uniform Fire Code and the International Fire Code. For the correct version of the code for your county, please contact your local government officials.

Texas Administrative Code Title 30, Chapter 217 (Design Criteria for Domestic Wastewater Systems), Rule 217.326 (Electrical and Fire Code Compliance) states that the facilities must comply with local fire codes. In the absence of a local fire code, the rule adopts the most recent edition of the Uniform Fire Code:

The wastewater treatment facility and collection system must conform to local fire codes. If the wastewater treatment facility is located in an area that does not have a local fire code, the wastewater treatment facility and collection system must comply with the most recent edition of National Fire Protection Association 1 Fire Code® at the time of installation.

Texas Administrative Code Title 16, Chapter 70 (Industrialized Housing and Buildings), Rule 70.100 (Mandatory Building Codes) adopts the International Fuel Gas Code 2015 for industrialized and modular residential buildings:

(a) Effective August 1, 2017, all industrialized housing and buildings, modules, and modular components, shall be constructed in accordance with the codes referenced in subsection (c) - (j).
[…]
(e) The International Fuel Gas Code, 2015 edition, published by the International Code Council, is adopted as the Fuel Gas Code of the Texas Industrialized Housing and Buildings Program.

Texas Administrative Code Title 16, Chapter 9 (LP-Gas Safety Rules), Rule 9.401 (Adoption by Reference of NFPA 58) adopts by reference the portions of the NFPA 30 2008 that apply to LP-gas activities. Please see the text of the rule for details.

Texas Administrative Code Title 16, Chapter 9 (LP-Gas Safety Rules), Rule 9.401 (Adoption by Reference of NFPA 58) adopts the 2008 edition of the NFPA 58. This rule also adopts multiple other NFPA codes by reference, in part or in entirety, that apply to LP-gas activities. Please see the text of the rule for details.

Texas Administrative Code Title 16, Chapter 9 (LP-Gas Safety Rules), Rule 9.301 (Adoption by Reference of NFPA 54) adopts the 2006 edition of the NFPA 54. This rule also adopts multiple other NFPA codes by reference, in part or in entirety, that apply to LP-gas activities. Please see the text of the rule for details.

Texas Administrative Code Title 28, Chapter 34 (State Fire Marshal), Rule 34.5 (Adopted Standards) adopts the NFPA 30A 1990, Automotive and Marine Service Station Code, for use through August 31, 2014.

Texas Administrative Code Title 28, Chapter 34 (State Fire Marshal), Rule 34.5 (Adopted Standards) adopts the NFPA 30A 2012, Code for Motor Fuel Dispensing Facilities and Repair Garages, for use on and after September 1, 2014.

Texas Administrative Code Title 28, Chapter 34 (State Fire Marshal), Rule 34.5 (Adopted Standards) adopts the NFPA 30 1990, Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code, for use on and after September 1, 2014.

Texas Administrative Code Title 28, Chapter 34 (State Fire Marshal), Rule 34.5 (Adopted Standards) adopts the NFPA 30 2012, Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code, for use through August 31, 2014.

Texas Administrative Code, Title 40, Chapter 98 (Day Activity and Health Services Requirements), Rule 98.42 (Safety) requires the use of the principles of the 2000 edition of the NFPA 101. Please see the text of the rule for additional details and interpretations.

Texas Administrative Code, Title 25, Chapter 117 (End Stage Renal Disease Facilities), Rule 117.101 (Construction Requirements for an Existing End Stage Renal Disease Facility) requires that existing licensed ESRD facilities meet the requirements for Existing Ambulatory Health Care Occupancies contained in Chapter 21 of the 2000 edition of the NFPA 101, Life Safety Code, (NFPA 101).

Texas Administrative Code Title 16, Chapter 75 (Air Conditioning and Refrigeration), Rule 75.100 (Technical requirements) allows the contractor to choose between the Uniform Mechanical Code and the International Mechanical Code, the International Fuel Gas Code, and the International Energy Conservation Code. For work permitted or started prior to January 1, 2018, the 2012 editions of these codes apply. For work on or after January 1, 2018, the 2015 codes apply.

Texas Administrative Code Title 16, Chapter 70 (Industrialized Housing and Buildings), Rule 70.100 (Mandatory Building Codes) adopts the 2015 edition of the International Mechanical Code for industrialized and modular buildings:

(a) Effective August 1, 2017, all industrialized housing and buildings, modules, and modular components, shall be constructed in accordance with the codes referenced in subsection (c) - (j).
[…]
(f) The International Mechanical Code, 2015 edition, published by the International Code Council, is adopted as the Mechanical Code of the Texas Industrialized and Buildings Program.

Occupations Code
Chapter 1301. Plumbers
Sec. 1301.255. Adoption of Plumbing Codes

Section 1301.255 adopts the Uniform Plumbing Code and the International Plumbing Code as they existed on May 31, 2001. The statute notes that the Texas State Board of Plumbing Examiners may adopt later versions of this code.

Texas Administrative Code Title 22, Chapter 367 (Enforcement), Rule 367.2 (Code Requirements) does adopt later versions of the code. This rule adopts the 2012 edition of the Uniform Plumbing Code; the 2012 International Plumbing Code; and the codes incorporated by reference within the International Plumbing Code. Please see the text of the rule for details.

Texas Administrative Code Title 40, Chapter 92 (Licensing Standards for Assisted Living Facilities), Rule 92.61 (Introduction and Application) requires that new construction of assisted living facility buildings and structures must comply with local codes. In the absence of local codes, the International Plumbing Code or the Uniform Plumbing Code, 2000 edition or later, applies. Please see the text of the rule for details.

Texas Administrative Code Title 16, Chapter 70 (Industrialized Housing and Buildings), Rule 70.100 (Mandatory Building Codes) adopts the 2015 edition of the IPC for industrialized and modular building:

(a) Effective August 1, 2017, all industrialized housing and buildings, modules, and modular components, shall be constructed in accordance with the codes referenced in subsection (c) - (j).
[…]
(g) The International Plumbing Code, 2015 edition, published by the International Code Council, is adopted as the Plumbing Code of the Texas Industrialized Housing and Buildings Program.

The IEEE does not provide free online access to its codes.

Statutes that adopt the National Electrical Safety Code (NESC) include:

The IAPMO offers limited online access to some editions of their publications. To view the documents, you may need to install Adobe Flash Player.

Administrative rules that adopt the National Standard Plumbing Code (NSPC) include:

Statutes and administrative rules that adopt the Uniform Mechanical Code (UMC) include:

Statutes and administrative rules that adopt the Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC) include:

* Some years and editions are not currently available for free online access through the publisher.

** The statute states “as it existed on May 31, 2001;” however, the State Board of Plumbing Examiners is allowed to adopt later editions. These years or editions might not be available for free online access through the publisher.

The ICC was formed from the merger of the Building Officials and Code Administrators International, Inc. (BOCA), the International Conference of Building Officials (ICBO), and the Southern Building Code Congress International, Inc. (SBCCI). References in the statutes to those groups now mean the ICC.

Statutes and administrative rules that adopt the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) include:

Statutes and administrative rules that adopt the International Existing Building Code (IEBC) include:

Statutes that adopt the International Fire Code (IFC) include:

Administrative rules that adopt the International Fuel Gas Code (IFGC) include:

Statutes and administrative rules that adopt the International Mechanical Code include:

Statutes and administrative rules that adopt the International Plumbing Code include:

Statutes and administrative rules that adopt the International Residential Code for One- and Two-Family Dwellings (IRC) include:

* Some years and editions are not currently available for free online access through the publisher.

** Some of the adopting statutes do not specify a year or edition of a code, adopt different codes for different date ranges, or the statutes may state that a code is adopted “as it existed on” a particular date. Please see the text of the rule or statute for details. The statutes may also allow agencies and code enforcement authorities to adopt later editions, and those years or editions might not be available for free online access through the publisher.

The NFPA allows free, read-only online access to some of their publications. In order to access their codes, you must first set up a profile and agree to their licensing restrictions.

Statutes and administrative rules that adopt the National Electrical Code (NFPA 70) include:

Administrative rules that adopt the National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code (NFPA 72) include:

Administrative rules that adopt the National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code (NFPA 54) include:

* Some years and editions are not currently available for free online access through the publisher.

** Some of the adopting statutes do not specify a year or edition of a code, or the statutes may state that a code is adopted “as it existed on” a particular date. The statutes may also allow agencies and code enforcement authorities to adopt later editions, and those years or editions might not be available for free online access through the publisher.

page last updated: 15 May 2019 8:30 AM